The Alan Katz Blog

Perspectives on Health Care Reform, Politics and More

When a Penalty is not a Penalty

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The penalty for going uninsured in 2016 is $695 per adult and $347.50 per child up to a maximum of $2,085 or 2.5% of household income, whichever is greater.

To determine the cost of coverage we’ll use the second-lowest silver plan available in a state. That’s the benchmark used to calculate ACA subsidies and in 2015 silver plans comprised roughly 68% of policies sold through an exchange. Even more important, I found a table showing the cost of the second-lowest cost Silver plan for 40 year olds by state, but I couldn’t find a similar table for other metallic levels.

The least our 40-year-old could spend on the second-lowest Silver plan this year is $2,196 in New Mexico; the highest premium is $8,628 in Alaska. The median average is $3,336. Divide the penalty by the premium and you get 32% of the cheapest premium and 21% of the median average premium. Put another way, paying the penalty saves our 40-year-old  consumer $1,500 in New Mexico and over $2,600 in the mythical state of median average.

I did find a table showing the national average premium a 21-year-old would pay for a bronze plan: $2,411.  In this situation the $695 penalty amounts to just 29% of the policy’s cost, a savings of over $1,700.

The purpose of this post is not to encourage people to go uninsured. I think that’s financially stupid given the cost of needing health insurance coverage and not having it. And, personally, I support the individual mandate. I also understand the political obstacles to establishing a real penalty for remaining uninsured.

However, I also believe the individual market in this country is in trouble. (More on this is a later post). Adverse selection is a contributing cause to this danger. The individual mandate is supposed to mitigate against adverse selection. The enforcement mechanism for that mandate, however, is a penalty that, for many people, is no penalty at all.

That’s not just my opinion. That’s the math.

A version of this article was originally posted on LinkedIn.