Congressional Health Care Reform Plan Waiting for New President

During their Ohio debate Tuesday night, Senator Hillary Clinton and Senator Barack Obama spent the opening 16 minutes diving deep into the minutia of their health care reform plans. The public has heard the debate many times before. One might be forgiven for believing the differences actually matter. They don’t.

The reality is that health care reform will be a top priority for either of these candidates should they gain the White House. What plan eventually emerges will be negotiated, compromised and updated so much and so often, it may bear little resemblance to the proposals Senators Clinton and Obama have put on the table. And that’s fine. No one has the secret formula. Crafting the best health care platform for America should involve a great many people not yet heard from.

Then there’s the health care reform proposal already waiting for the new president. Sponsored by Democratic Senator Ron Wyden and Republican Senator Bob Bennett, the Healthy Americans Act is the most bi-partisan and prominent bill stewing in the current Congress — or any recent one, for that matter.  Supported by a dozen senators, six from each party, in many ways it goes much further than the plans being promoted by the Democratic presidential candidates. And compared to Senator John McCain’s market-based reform plan, it’s downright radical.

Twelve percent of the Senate is a long way from a majority. But it’s a start. Even Senators Wyden and Bennett don’t agree with every aspect of their bill. The plan requires all Americans to buy coverage. It does away with the preferential tax treatment of employer-based coverage, forcing individuals to purchase their own coverage through regional purchasing pools. While it’s not a single-payer system, those pools do mean multiple governmental agencies will be running the show.

The Healthy Americans Act is, as it stands, seriously flawed. But that’s not the point. The details of this legislation don’t matter any more than the specifics of the candidate’s proposals. What matters is the existence of a bi-partisan coalition of Senators waiting for a president who is serious about building a consensus to appear on the scene. That’s fertile ground for a serious debate and equally serious negotiations about a complex and vital issue. And that’s good news.