Health Care Reform Math Adds Up To Compromise

When it comes to health care reform, it’s all about the math.

The First Element: Trump and Winning

President Donald Trump hates to lose. He’s about winning until we’re all sick of winning. (His words, not mine). The American Health Care Act, Republican’s attempt to replace the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, failed. Support was so scarce House Speaker Paul Ryan and the President didn’t even bring it to a floor vote in March.

The press said President Trump lost. Given his vocal support and strong lobbying for the bill, this assessment was accurate, but one the President cannot, and, apparently, will not accept. He sent his team to try to salvage the bill before the April recess. They failed. Which was a bit surprising given that President Trump seems more focused on passing a bill – any bill – than on the substance of legislation.

This is the first number in our health care reform equation: President Trump wants to win and doesn’t care how.

The Second Element: Divided Republicans

It takes a simple majority to pass a bill out of the House. With 434 current members (the elevation of Jim Price to Secretary of Health and Human Services leaves one seat vacant) 218 votes are required to pass legislation.  There are currently 246 Republicans in Congress. Having already shut Democrats out of the process, all but 28 members of the GOP caucus are needed to pass a bill; a 29th Republican “No ” vote and the bill fails.

There are about 40 members of the House Freedom Caucus, a group of the chamber’s most conservative lawmakers. The majority of the caucus were united in opposition to the AHCA. In March President Trump blamed them for the bills defeat. In April he sent his emissaries to get their votes.

The Freedom Caucus demanded elimination of some of the ACA’s most popular provisions as the price of their support. These provisions prevent carriers from excluding coverage for pre-existing and requiring health plans include certain essential benefits like maternity coverage. The White House reportedly considered acquiescing to these demands.

The problem, however, was that accepting the Freedom Caucus demands resulted in (relatively) moderate GOP Members abandoning the AHCA. Gaining conservatives votes doesn’t help if the cost is an equal number of moderate votes. There may be a path to pass the AHCA solely relying on solely on Republican votes, but given the divide between conservative and mainstream Republicans, it’s hard to find it.

Which provides the second number for our equation: Republican can’t pass health care reform on their own.

The Third Element: Democrats Want Repair

Democrats, believe the ACA has been good for America, especially for those who, but for the ACA, would have no health care coverage. Most liberal Democrats think the ACA doesn’t go far enough. They won’t be satisfied with anything less than a single-payer system.

Many Democrats, however, think the ACA is generally fine, but in need of critical tweaking to keep it working. Some liberals will hold out for their dream of “Medicare for All,” but even many in their ranks will take a repaired ACA over a broken system or what Republicans are offering.

Which is why Democrats united against the Republican plan. Not that it mattered. Republicans never sought Democratic votes for the ACA.

Democrats want to fix the ACA. That’s the third number and final number in our health care reform equation.

The Math of Health Care Reform Compromise

If President Trump wants to win he needs to move beyond a purely Republican formulation. Otherwise, as shown above, the math doesn’t work. Republicans need the larger numbers Democrats provide to pass health care reform legislation.

How does this math work? Let’s say a health care reform package reaches the floor of the House that attracts 164 Republicans – just two-thirds of their caucus. However, it gains support from 54 Democrats – only one-third of their caucus. The bill moves on to the Senate. In short, it’s easier to find 218 votes among 434 Members than from among 246.

This path makes the challenge before the President straightforward, if difficult: find a legislative package that attracts enough Democratic votes to offset the Republican votes it loses. In the old days (before Washington because hyper-partisan) pragmatists from both parties would meet and hammer out a compromise. That’s what’s needed now. Significantly, there’s plenty of common ground to be found.

There are ACA taxes neither Republicans and Democrats like. Eliminate them. The Shared Responsibility Payments that penalize Americans for going without coverage is universally acknowledged to be ineffective. Fix it. Both Democrats and many Republican want to keep the ACA’s Medicaid expansion. Preserve it.

The path to a compromise won’t be easy, but the equation is simple addition: President Trump wants to win and doesn’t care how PLUS Republicans can’t pass health care reform on their own PLUS Democrats’ want to fix the ACA. The result: compromise.

Political Cover

The biggest obstacle to achieving health care reform is not the math, it’s the politics. Incumbents in both parties dread being “primaried” – Republicans fear being challenged from the right; Democrats from the left.

This is not paranoia. The extremes of both parties will seek vengeance on their less pure teammates. Party leaders and the Administration will need to give these members extensive cover in terms of messaging, campaign money and resources to beat back these attacks. Or they will need to convince the public that failing to achieve health care reform is a worse outcome than the compromise.

This is where President Trump proves he deserves to win. He must demonstrate his self-proclaimed negotiating prowess and his proven marketing acumen can create a political environment where compromise on health care reform doesn’t doom incumbents.

In other words, for President Trump to win he needs to make sure that members of Congress win, too.  Otherwise, he loses. That’s politics—and math.

For curated articles on health care reform, please checkout the Alan Katz Health Care Reform Magazine on Flipboard.

Trump’s ACA Reform Principles and What They May Mean

President Donald Trump gave a speech to a joint session of Congress Tuesday night. A significant portion of his speech dealt with his commitment to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. What did he say, what does what he said mean, and what will be the impact on the ACA?

What He Said

President Trump devoted considerable time to discussing his goal to repeal and replace Obamacare. Here is what the President said, “Tonight, I am also calling on this Congress to repeal and replace Obamacare with reforms that expand choice, increase access, lower costs, and at the same time, provide better Healthcare.”

Then, after reciting his criticism of the Affordable Care Act he proclaimed, “We must act decisively to protect all Americans.  Action is not a choice — it is a necessity. “So I am calling on all Democrats and Republicans in the Congress to work with us to save Americans from this imploding Obamacare disaster.”

He then cited five principles that “should guide the Congress as we move to create a better healthcare system for all Americans:

“First, we should ensure that Americans with pre-existing conditions have access to coverage, and that we have a stable transition for Americans currently enrolled in the healthcare exchanges.

“Secondly, we should help Americans purchase their own coverage, through the use of tax credits and expanded Health Savings Accounts — but it must be the plan they want, not the plan forced on them by the Government.

“Thirdly, we should give our great State Governors the resources and flexibility they need with Medicaid to make sure no one is left out.

“Fourthly, we should implement legal reforms that protect patients and doctors from unnecessary costs that drive up the price of insurance — and work to bring down the artificially high price of drugs and bring them down immediately.

“Finally, the time has come to give Americans the freedom to purchase health insurance across State lines — creating a truly competitive national marketplace that will bring cost way down and provide far better care.”

What He Meant

I hesitate to try interpret what President Trump means when he, well, uses words. We’re talking a moving target here.  However, given the gravity of the speech, I assume what he said was thoroughly vetted and intentional.  So, I’ll go try to interpret the President’s message. Full disclosure, however, Republicans are already fighting over the meaning of his five health care reform principles, so there’s clearly room for differing interpretations.

Pre-existing conditions: In the past, President Trump has expressed the desire to keep the ACA’s guarantee issue provisions that prevents insurers from declining coverage due to a consumer’s health status.  Last night, however, he said used a different wording, stating that pre-existing conditions should not bar Americans from having “access” to coverage. These are two different things. The ACA requires carriers accept consumers, even those with expensive medical conditions, into any plan for which the consumer is eligible. Calling for access means that, as an alternative, these Americans could be shunted into high-risk pools or plans designed specifically for high cost insureds.

Offering access to high-risk pools means Americans with existing medical conditions would have fewer choices, limited benefits and pay higher premiums than their healthier neighbors. In testimony before a California legislative committee I once referred to high-risk pools as “a ghetto of second-hand coverage.” The author of the legislation establishing the state’s pool sat on the committee. Oops. But I stand by my description.

The President indicating a willingness to accept high-risk pools was good news for House Speaker Paul Ryan, who supports them. However, there are millions of Americans with pre-existing health conditions. How will they react to being removed from the “normal” market? And how will they, and their family and friends, express those feelings at the polls?

Tax Credits and HSAs: Health Savings Accounts have long been a staple of Republican health care reform proposals.  In a draft of Speaker Ryan’s Obamacare replacement bill, leaked last week, tax credits are the primary means of making health insurance premiums affordable. Conservatives have pushed back against tax credits calling them a new non-means tested entitlement program. The President’s backing of this approach will give the Speaker some leverage in negotiations with these members of the GOP caucus in the House.

Medicaid: President Trump’s call for giving governors more say in how their states implement Medicaid seems to support efforts to move federal payments for the program into block grants, which aligns the White House with Republicans in the House.  Currently states receive funds based on Medicaid enrollment (subject to a host of adjustments for a variety of factors, but let’s keep it simple for now). Block grants would give states a fixed amount to spend within very broad federal guidelines. This approach enables the federal government to cap their spending on the program and leaves it to states to manage the program.

Lowering the Cost of Care: Too often the debate over health insurance affordability ignores a harsh reality: the major driver of health insurance premiums is the cost of medical care. Most of the President’s principles concerning health care reform focuses on health care coverage. But he’s also seeking to lower costs through malpractice reform and through taking steps to drive down the cost of prescriptions. That the President is addressing medical expenses at all is a good thing. Hopefully as a replacement to the Affordable Care Act moves through Congress there will be an even greater emphasis placed on reducing the cost of medical treatments and services.

Interstate Sales: President Trump and many Republicans invoke letting consumers buy out-of-state coverage with the same passion as Hogwarts students learning their first spells. They proclaim it will increase competition and lower premiums across the country. Like that school of witchcraft and wizardry, however, this proposal is, unfortunately, a fantasy. I’ll write a post on why soon, but for now consider just one factor. Virtually all health insurance policies sold today rely on discounts offered by “in-network” doctors, hospitals and other providers of care. Plans sold in State A may look good to a consumer in State B, but if that carrier doesn’t have a strong network in State B, what good is that policy? In short,

The Impact

Let’s assume I’ve interpreted what the President said correctly. What will be the impact of his position on whatever Obamacare repeal and replace bill that emerges from Congress and lands on his desk to sign?

First, it is very significant that the President’s health care reform principles align as closely as they do with those of Speaker Ryan. This gives the Speaker a powerful card to play when herding his splintered caucus behind his preferred legislation.

Second, it seems to signal that the White House is ceding to Congress the responsibility to develop an ACA replacement. The President carved out no bold vision for what he wants nor are his principles in conflict with longstanding Republican positions. The only exception is his call for federal action to lower prescription drug costs. But would President Trump veto a bill that meets all of his principles except for this one? Doubtful.

Third, we’re only at the beginning of long, arduous march to reforming or replacing the Affordable Care Act. There’s many more parties will be heard from, including Senate Republicans, insurers, pharmaceutical companies, doctors, hospitals and other special interest groups. The public will have a lot to say on this subject, too. Plus, any reform package will likely require support from Democrats, and negotiations for those votes have not yet begun.

As I’ve written previously, what Republicans are putting forward now may bear only a passing resemblance to the health care reform we get at the end of what will be a very long, messy slog.

Please check out my health care reform magazine on Flipboard for constantly updated, curated articles.

Upcoming GOP Reform Package is Just the Start

Up until now, the debate over the repeal and replace of the Affordable Care Act has been limited to the reading of tea leaves and, at best, educated guesses. We’re about to get some meaningful data. Earlier this month, House Speaker Paul Ryan promised that Republicans in the House would unveil their health care reform legislation after the mid-February Congressional break. And, in fact, details of the GOP leadership’s Obamacare replacement plan leaked today. (More on that, below).

The introduction of this GOP health care reform proposal is significant, but hardly as earth shattering as you might think based on the news coverage over the leak, let alone the attention the official unveiling will generate. Nor is this proposal necessarily indicative reflective of whats going to emerge from Congress at the end of this process. Think of it as allowing educated guesses to be a bit more educated. That’s important, but it determines nothing.

If you’re interested in what the 106-page document leaked today shows, Sarah Kliff of Vox.com has an excellent analysis. She writes that “In broad strokes, the draft bill hews closely to ideas outlined by House Speaker Paul Ryan and Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price.” However, she does identify one “important shift” from earlier GOP proposals: “This bill … has more generous financial support for those who buy their own plans … and lower penalties for Americans who do not maintain continuous insurance coverage.”

Of course, the first question to ask is whether the leaked document is legitimate. The answer appears to be yes. There’s no bombshell that would suggest it’s only a trial balloon. It hews closely to the long-espoused reforms put forward by Republicans supporting high-risk pools, promoting HSAs and permitting health insurers to sell across state lines. Let’s assume, then, what we’re seeing today is exactly what Speaker Ryan will unveil next week. Does it matter?

Yes, but not much.

Changing America’s health care system will take time, regardless of how many politicians tell you otherwise. There are a lot of reasons why. Here’s just three:

  1. Republicans can’t agree on what they want to do. Just in the House of Representatives there a numerous factions each looking for a different outcome. The (very) conservative Freedom Caucus wants to repeal the entire ACA now and deal with a replacement later (if ever). Establishment members want to work out the replacement plan first and then simultaneously repeal and replace the ACA after a long transition period. Some of the two dozen members who represent districts that went for Hillary Clinton in the recent presidential election (and, I suspect, a percentage of those who endured raucous town hall meetings this week) seem more intent on repairing the ACA as opposed to blowing it up. Meanwhile, Republicans in the Senate can’t agree on what should follow the Affordable Care Act either. Many Senators, however, seem certain they don’t like the direction the House is taking. In short, consensus among Republicans is a long way off.
  2. Republicans need Democrats to replace the ACA. Even if Republicans reach a consensus on health care reform, they still need to bring along some Democrats to get the job done. Yes, heavy damage can be inflicted on the ACA through changes to the federal budget that require a simple majority of lawmakers in each chamber to pass. Regulations and executive orders can tear down more of it. Replacing the Affordable Care Act, however, will require at least 60 votes in the Senate (unless Republicans take the highly unlikely step of ending filibusters). With only 52 Republican Senators that means at least eight Democrats have to vote for the replacement legislation. And if Republicans factions in the House get too entrenched, the House Leadership may need some Democratic votes in that chamber to get anything passed. All of which means a lot of negotiating before there’s any hope of getting a new health care reform bill on President Donald Trump’s desk..
  3. The stakes are high–really, really high. As I’ve written previously, if Republicans get health care reform wrong they could destroy the individual health insurance marketplace. And I mean destroy. In fact, it may be too late to save the individual market (a possibility I’ll have another post on soon). Yet the GOP has been promising their base to nuke the Affordable Care Act and replace it with something better since before it was passed. Republicans need to act, but in a way that doesn’t leave their party explaining to voters why the demise of individual coverage is not Republicans’ fault.

Don’t get me wrong. That the GOP House leadership is introducing health care reform legislation is a meaningful milestone along the path to a post-Obama American health care system. If Secretary Price and President Trump sign-on to the bill, it will be a “big league” milestone. At the end of the day, however, it’s a milestone, not the finish line; just the first steps in what will be a long slog through numerous committees, endless public posturing, lobbying by interest groups, tumultuous public demonstrations, and intense negotiation. What Republicans are putting forward now may bear only a passing resemblance to what we get at slog’s end.

Please check out my health care reform magazine on Flipboard for constantly updated, curated articles.

Republican Health Care Reform: Destruction or Refinement?

capitol-at-dusk

With the (surprising) election of Donald Trump as America’s next president I’ve been asked by quite a few folks what this might mean for the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, especially as it relates to individual health insurance. It’s been over seven months since I posted anything in this blog (been busy launching a couple of companies), but I thought I’d use this space to provide my perspective on the answer.

For the impatient among you, that answer is: either a complete disaster or some modest fixes that actually improve the ACA. Dramatic, but non-lethal changes, are unlikely.

As for the details: Mr. Trump’s call to repeal and replace the ACA was core to his campaign. His official health care reform platform promised to:

  1. Repeal Obamacare in its entirety.
  2. Permit the sale of health insurance across state lines.
  3. Allow individuals to fully deduct their health insurance premiums.
  4. Promote Health Savings Accounts.
  5. Require all health care providers to publish their pricing.
  6. Provide block-grants to states for Medicaid expenses.
  7. Remove barriers that delay the introduction of new drugs.

Some of these ideas, such as promoting HSAs and increasing pricing transparency, have merit. Some, like enabling carriers to sell across state lines, are nonsensical for several reasons I described in a February LinkedIn post. None, however, offer much solace to the 20+ million consumers in danger of losing their individual coverage if the ACA is repealed. Mr. Trump and his Republican allies in Congress will need to do more.

I hesitate to predict how Mr. Trump will lead as president. He seems to be  a “big picture guy” who leaves details to others. So let’s assume he lets Congress take the lead on repeal and replace. In December 2015, Republicans in Congress passed legislation aimed at gutting the ACA. President Barack Obama vetoed the bill, but its major provisions are instructive:

  1. Repeal the federal government’s authority to run health care exchanges.
  2. Eliminate premium subsidies available to individuals purchasing through the exchange.
  3. Eliminate penalties on individuals for not buying coverage and employers who failed to offer their worker’s health insurance.

Combined with Mr. Trump’s campaign promises, these elements of the Republicans’ repeal and replace legislation, give a glimpse to the starting point of GOP-style health care reform. Add House Speaker Paul Ryan’s call earlier this year for high-risk pools and the hazy outlines of a possible reform package begins to emerge.

Given Mr. Trump’s commitment to start the repeal and replace process on the first day of his administration and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s statement yesterday that getting rid of the ACA was “pretty high on our agenda,” health care reform is coming — and soon.

Whether the result will be an outright, actual repeal of President Obama’s signature legislative accomplishment is no sure thing. Supporters of the ACA are already vowing to defend the law. And while Republicans will hold majorities in both chambers of the new Congress, they are a long way from having 60 votes in the Senate. And that’s problematic.

Senate filibuster rules require 60 votes to cut-off debate and allow legislation to come to a vote. This means the most powerful person in Washington on health care reform may not be President Trump, Speaker Ryan, or Senator McConnell, but the Senator needed for that all important 60th vote. Yes, the first through 59th supporters are important, but their support means little if a 60th vote is not found. As a result, the 60th Senator can have a tremendous impact on the final language in the bill simply by offering (implicitly or explicitly) a favorable vote in exchange for whatever is important to that Senator.

In 2017, the 60th Senator for repeal and replace will be a Democrat. A Republican is expected to win Louisiana’s run-off election giving the GOP a 52 seat majority in the upper chamber. Assuming Republicans vote as a block — something they’ve become quite adept at in the past eight years — eight Democratic votes will be needed to end a filibuster. The requests of each of the first seven will need to be considered and addressed, but it’s the demands of the eighth Senator, that 60th vote, that ultimately matters. Unless …

The Senate can temporarily eliminate the possibility of a filibuster against a bill under the rules of budget reconciliation. However, reconciliation bills must address the federal budget; a vague definition that Congress has interpreted with varying strictness throughout the years. Clearly, eliminating funding for exchanges, taxes, and monetary penalties impact the budget. Much of the ACA, however, doesn’t. For example, requiring carriers to issue individual policies to all applicants regardless of their health conditions (what’s called “guarantee issue”) has no impact on the budget.

This creates a dangerous, even apocryphal, situation. Just one example: Republicans use the reconciliation process to eliminate penalties paid by consumers who fail to purchase health insurance, but not the guarantee issue requirement. Under this situation, few consumers — especially young, healthy consumers — will likely obtain coverage until they get sick or injured. This adverse selection would be cataclysmic and few, if any carriers, would want to participate in such a market. After all, insurers are in the business of spreading risk across a broad population. Guarantee issue without an obligation to buy coverage guarantees a concentration of risk across a narrow population.

President Trump can significantly impact the Affordable Care Act through Executive Orders, but the risk is the same as a partial repeal through legislation. The ACA is a multi-faceted construct with interlocking pieces. The wrong changes can cause devastating unintended consequences.

Republicans in Congress and President Trump may not care. The ACA has taken on nearly mythic proportions as the symbol of all that is evil with the liberal, big government side of politics. However, doing so would not only be irresponsible, it would risk the wrath of millions of voters tossed out of the individual market. Those votes matter. Keep in mind, Donald Trump’s election was close. He lost the popular vote. His leads in Wisconsin and Michigan add up to a combined total of less than 40,000 (as of today).

Yet failing to repeal Obamacare after making it so central to their 2016 campaigns could be a political disaster as well. Republicans jumped on replace and repeal in 2010 and over the past six years this position helped deliver durable GOP majorities in both houses of Congress. Many in their ranks may not care about the consequences of dismantling the law.

Assuming a desire to address health care reform in a responsible way will require the help of at least eight Senate Democrats. Fortunately for Republicans, ten Democrats have an incentive to responsibly neutralize the ACA issue in 2017. All are up for election in 2018 and hail from red or nearly red states.

  • Senator Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin
  • Senator Bob Casey, Jr. of  Pennsylvania
  • Senator Joe Donnelly of Indiana
  • Senator Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota
  • Senator Tim Kaine of Virginia
  • Senator Angus King of Maine (officially an Independent, but he caucuses with Democrats)
  • Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia (and arguably the most conservative Democrat in the Senate)
  • Senator Claire McCaskill of Missouri.
  • Senator Debbie Stabenow of Michigan
  • Senator Jon Tester of Montana

The important question, then, is not what Republicans want to replace the ACA with, but what will it take to get enough of these Senators to come along? A task that could be extremely difficult if new Senate Minority Leader, Charles Schumer, doesn’t make it politically impossible for many of these Senators to break ranks.

Republican then have two choices:1) go nuclear and gut the ACA through the reconciliation process, but keep in place market reforms like guarantee issue; or 2) pass something palatable to eight Democrats, but which they sell as “repeal” to their base. Clearly the first option is irresponsible, but these are not necessarily responsible times. Nuking the ACA will appeal to many in the party, both in Congress and in their districts.

The more responsible choice, repealing the ACA in name only, makes the law more palatable and workable. This last point is critical: once they repeal and replace the ACA, the GOP will own health care reform. It darn well better be clear by say, October 2018, that the new system is working.

Which result — destruction or refinement — is most likely? We’re in a new and wacky world. We’ll find out soon enough.

Health Insurance Brokers to the GOP: “Et Tu?”

Health insurance brokers are appropriately worried about the impact health care reform will have on their livelihood. That’s human nature. Politics is about the management of self-interest. When it comes to health care reform, the list of concerned onlookers is long. Patients, doctors, hospitals, carriers, government bureaucrats, health insurance agents, employers, lawyers, dentists, chiropractors, pharmaceuticalfirms and, well, you get the idea.  Anymeaningful change is going to require sacrifice by most all of these stakeholders. 

When it comes to balancing all these competing interests, the partisan nature of American politics usually comes into play. Public policy flowing from the Democratic party tends to benefit some at the expense of others. The same holds true with the Republican party.

Health insurance brokers, for example, tend to rely on the GOP to promote policies supportive of their profession. One reason for this connection is political. I’ve no empirical data, but long experience in working with health insurance brokers leads me to believe that the majority vote Republican. Another reason, however, is ideological. Republicans tend to support market-based health care reform solutions  and brokers are integral to making the market work. Brokers take competing health plans and interpret them to their prospects and clients. One method they use is to take the different explanations of benefits used by different competitors and put them into a consistent template. They serve as consumer’s advisers and, when needed, their advocates to assure they get full value from their health plans.

As President Barack Obama’s Administration works with the Democratic majority in Congress to fashion health care reform, many brokers are relying on Republicans in Congress to stand firm against a public plan (which most brokers believe would eventually drive private plans out of existence — and take brokers down the drain with them). And they are trusting Republicans will make the case for the value brokers add to the system.

This trust may be misplaced.

Last week four leading Republicans put forward “The Patients’ Choice Act.” The Act is their call to action for fixing what they refer to as America’s broken health care system while at the same time seeking to preserve much of the current market driven arrangement. The authors of the proposal, Senators Tom Coburn and Richard Burr and by Congressmen Paul Ryan and Devin Nunes, are leading voices within their party on health care reform. It’s not clear whether the Patients’ Choice Act is the official position of the Republican caucuses in Congress, but no other proposal has been forth by the GOP. And the media is certainly treating it as the “Republican health care reform plan.”

Not suprisingly, the GOP lawmakers explicitly reject a public health program. Indeed, while acknowledging other factors leading to runaway costs (new technology, an aging population) their document proclaims the primary reason America’s health care system fails so many patients is “government intervention.”

Nonetheless, there are several elements of the Patients’ Choice Act which occupy common ground with Democrats (more on these in a future post). Some of what’s in The Patients’ Choice Act summary is, suprising and even amusing. For example, Republicans have taken to accusing Democrats of seeking to move America to “European-style socialism.” Yet, in justifying some of their ideas the sponsors of the Act turn to similar programs working in — wait for it — Europe.

Some elements of the reform package are just foolish. For example, under the Patients’ Choice Act carriers to accept all applicants regardless of their health condition (often referred to as “guarantee issue”). However, explicitly reject requiring individuals to obtain coverage stating that “if individuals do not want health insurance, they will not be forced to have it.” In fact, they go so far as to suggest that individuals be able to purchase coverage at any time “through places of employment, emergency rooms, the DMV, etc.”

In taking this position it appears the the Republicans have adopted the greatest flaw in then candidate-Obama’s health care reform plan — and made it worse. Why would anyone purchase coverage before they need it? Any reasonable person would wait until they’re on their way to the doctor, stop by the DMV and purchase coverage. In case of an accident, all they would need to do is go to the emergency room (the most expensive place to receive care), sign up at the receiving desk and enter the facility as a fully insured patient. As soon as they’ve recovered, it would be safe to drop the coverage.

(I find it hard to believe the Republicans are taking such a naive view of insurance. And, to be fair, the Patients’ Choice Act is somewhat lacking in details. However, what I’ve described comes from the Republican lawmakers’ own document. If they are creating safeguards to prevent such gaming of the system, there’s no evidence of it yet.)

As with any health care reform proposal, there’s elements to like and to dislike in the the Patients’ Choice Act. What will be most troubling for brokers, however, is the GOP’s call for creating state-based exchanges. The benefits of such exchanges includes a “one-stop marketplace for health insurance. Individuals would get a hassle-free opportunity to choose the plan that best meets their needs through an Exchange.” Most brokers believe that’s their role in the current system. To have Republicans propose a state agency to take on this responsibility is disconcerting at best; a betrayal at worst.

Then there’s the “auto-enrollment” feature touted by the Republicans allowing individuals to obtain health insurance at the DMV and other locations. Apparently the GOP sees little value in having consumers work with licensed, regulated agents and brokers, not when there’s a clerk at the DMV available.

To be fair, the Republicans are not explicitly excluding brokers from their version of a new health care system. In fact, they are expected to remain a part of the system. In the GOP’s “Patients’ Choice Act Q&As they write, “Whether an individual uses an insurance broker, an internet [sic] comparison page, or calls a toll free number, individuals are provided the information needed to choose a plan tailored to their individuals [sic] needs.” This basically equates the knowledge, skills and expertise of  independent brokers to what can be delivered by an Internet site or a customer service rep at the state Exchange. How comforting.  Perhaps they are relying on the Exchange to standardize health insurance so much that professional guidance is no longer required. Although if coverage is that standardized, then perhaps calling their proposal the Patients’ Choice Act might be somewhat misleading.

The National Association of Health Underwriters, the primary professional organization for health insurance brokers, is working hard to educate lawmakers concerning the value independent brokers add to the system — value which should be preserved in whatever reform package emerges from Washington.  To the extent the Patients’ Choice Act represents Republican thinking on health care reform, relying on the GOP as an ally in this effort could be a painful path to disappointment.