27 Senators Call for Public Health Insurance Plan

Twentyseven Democratic Senators have signed onto a “sense of the Senate” resolution demanding that a government-run health plan be included in whatever health care reform bill emerges from Congress. Staking out the liberal position for what will be one of the most controversial elements of this year’s health care reform debate, the Senators define a public health insurance option as “essential to reform” according to a report on Politico.com.

Of course, there are government-run plans and then there are government-run plans. As Politico reports, Senator Max Baucus, chair of the Senate Finance Committee, has said that while he expects any comprehensive health care reform legislation emerging from his committee to include a public plan this shouldn’t frighten opponents. “There are says to skin a cat. There are ways to find a solution,” the site quotes him as saying. One option under consideration, for example, is a “‘fallback’ plan, which would trigger a public insurance option if private competition proves inadequate in a geographic region.”

Most Republicans and many moderate Democrats have said they would oppose a health care reform bill if it includes a government-run health plan to compete with private carriers. Whether they would accept the idea of such a plan as a “fallback” is unknown.

Among those co-sponsoring the resolution are several important players in the health care reform debate. For example, Senator Edward Kennedy chairs the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee which will, along with the Senate Finance Committee, is drafting health care reform legislation. And Senators Dick Durbin and Charles Schumer are members of the Democrat’s leadership team in the Senate. Missing from the list are any members of the Moderate Dems Working Group — 18 Democrats (including one independent) who may seek to block inclusion of a government-run plan in health care reform legislation.

The 27 Senators listed by Politico as co-sponsoring the sense of the Senate resolution are:
Jeff Bingaman (D-N.M.)
Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.),
Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio)
Roland W. Burris (D-Ill.)
Benjamin Cardin (D-Md.).
Bob Casey (D-Pa.)
Chris Dodd (D-Conn.)
Dick Durbin (D-Ill.)
Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.)
Tom Harkin (D-Iowa),
Daniel K. Inouye (D-Hawaii)
Ted Kaufman (D-Del.)
Edward Kennedy (D-Mass.)
Frank R. Lautenberg (D-N.J.)
Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.)
Carl Levin (D-Mich.)
Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.)
Robert Menendez (D-N.J.)
Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.)
Barbara A. Mikulski (D-Md.)
Jack Reed (D-R.I.)
Bernie Sanders (I-Vt. – an independent, Senator Sanders caucuses with Democrats)
Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.)
Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.)
Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.)
Tom Udall (D-N.M.)
Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.)

Obama Health Care Reform Strategy Sidesteps Clinton’s Missteps

The number of mistakes made by the Clinton Administration in pushing for health care reform in 1993 are embarrassingly numerous.  One of the most damning was their heavy handed approach with Congress. Instead of engaging with lawmakers from the beginning, the task force led by then First Lady Hillary Clinton worked behind closed doors. Democratic Congressional Members were pushed out of the loop and expected, I assume, to fall in line with their Democratic President because, well, he was their Democratic President. Oh, and of course because the health care reform package developed by the task force was so obviously wonderful.

Leaving aside the lack of wonderfulness in the plan they developed, this approach was nothing short of political malpractice. The president may propose, but it’s Congress that enacts legislation. Any effort to dramatically change something as expensive and personal as health care will generate opposition. Some of that opposition is based on sincere differences of opinion concerning public policy. Some emerges from economic or political agendas threatened by the changes. In either event, it’s important to have a strong base with a unified message to withstand the inevitable attacks. The Clinton Administration’s approach — imposing their viewpoint on Congress — meant they had few supporters when and where they needed them most. The result was a political rout that helped open the way to a Republican takeover of Congress in 1994.

Whether based on temperament or wisdom earned at the Clinton presidency’s expense, President Barack Obama and his team are approaching health care reform in a far different manner. Their outreach to Congress has been extraordinary. They are not only working with Congressional leaders to design the plan, but are helping to create a unified message as well.

The Associated Press reported on a meeting today between several Democratic Senators and White House political advisor David Axelrod. Their goal, according to Senator Dick Durbin, was to “coordinate our messaging so we present a health care reform effort that the American people trust.”

The meeting was, in part, a response to advice circulated among Republicans by Dr. Frank Luntz outlining ways to attack the Democratic proposal. Dr. Luntz is a highly regarded GOP consultant and an expert on political messaging, the author of Words That Work: It’s Not What You Say, It’s What People Hear. He urged Republicans to be “on the side of reform.” while attacking the Administration’s proposal as leading “to the government setting standards of care, instead of doctors” and “to the government rationing care.”

The 26-page report has caused quite a stir on Capital Hill. Democrats in Congress wanted to make sure they were prepared to withstand the suggested assault. The meeting today with Senators and with House Leaders yesterday were designed to do just that. It was reinforced by a message to the grass roots following President Obama developed during the campaign that now operates as Organizing for America.

What was agreed to was a three-pronged message: medical costs must be lowered, people must have choice in their health care coverage, and care must be affordable for everyone. How these principles are put into action has yet to be determined. No legislation has yet emerged from the numerous Congressional hearings underway.

It’s the lack of explicit information that makes framing the reform effort so important. Until there’s actual legislation to read, all the public has to go on is the general policy positions pronounced by various parties. Eventually, we’ll see a bill, but how the public reacts to it will be influenced to some degree by the spinning that occurs before its release.

By involving Democrats in Congress early in the process of developing the legislative language and working with them to shape a unified message, the Obama Administration is sidestepping one of the most damaging missteps of the Clinton Administration. Ultimately what will matter is the legislation itself. But the mere fact that President Obama and his team are avoiding the mistakes made 16 years ago, is an indication of how different the battle will be this time.