Speaker Nunez on Health Care Reform 2008

According to Assembly Speaker Fabian Nunez, there’s no chance of California passing comprehensive health care reform before 2009 — if then. But that won’t stop the legislature from pursuing more narrowly focused  changes to the state’s health care system.

Frank Russo, who publishes the California Progress Report blog, was among those who talked to the Speaker following a press conference on Tuesday at the Sacramento Press Club.  Mr. Russo describes Speaker Nunez as being “quite animated” discussing the headlines that day concerning Blue Cross of California asking physicians to confirm the disclosure of pre-existing conditions on members’ applications (a practice Blue Cross has now discontinued). He quotes the Speaker as blasting the carrier and then promising, “No comprehensive health care package, but reforms to help improve the current health care system—absolutely.”

This is further evidence Senate Bill 840, Senator Shiela Kuehl’s legislation to establish a single payer system in California, is going nowhere this year. The Speaker again promised to subject the measure to the same level of scrutiny Senator Kuehl, as chair of the Senate Health Committee, gave to the Speaker’s comprehensive health care reform package, Assembly Bill ABX1-1. And if by some miracle — or political calculation — SB 840 were to be passed by the legislature, Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger would be certain to veto it.

Instead of comprehensive reform, I expect lawmakers to introduce several elements of ABX1-1. Setting a medical loss ratio target was an aspect of ABX1-1 that resonated with lawmakers — and will be looked at even more favorably in an election year. Bills addressing rescissions and establishing premium rate regulation mechanisms are also certain to emerge. There will be others. Few of these bills, however, are likely to become law. First, not all will pass. If money is a bill’s chances fall to near zero. Second, Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger will look closely at those that do make it through the legislature. During the health care reform negotiations that led to ABX1-1, he demonstrated a firm understanding of how the elements of ABX1-1 related to one another. He will likely be skeptical of a modular approach to reform, reasoning that without the checks and balances contained in ABX1-1, the consequences of a specific reform could do more harm than good.

There’s a good chance California won’t take another shot at comprehensive health care reform even in 2009. The timing will depend a great deal on who wins the White House in November. If a Democratic becomes president, California lawmakers will likely wait to see what progress on health care reform the new Administration can make. If a Republican wins, however, Democrats won’t wait. They’ll assume whatever reforms come out of Washington will be insufficient. The wild card in the timing? Governor Schwarzenegger. He’s termed out of office in 2010. He may want to finish what he started in 2007 while he can.

In either case, health care reform is not going away. Only the location may change.