America’s Disappearing Common Ground

Everyone knows the reason so little gets done in Washington is that the two political parties have become ever more divided and uncooperative. We can see it on cable news programs. We can hear it on talk radio. And we experience it as the federal government generates more crises than solutions. We also experience it every Thanksgiving dinner when our crazy uncle starts spouting eye-roll inducing political nonsense.

For those of us engaged with health care reform, we witness this dynamic every time politicians on both sides of the aisle identify the same problem, but refuse to work together to resolve it.

Subjectively, we all know common ground is shrinking in this country. Turns out there’s objective evidence, too. The Pew Research Center tracked the distribution of political values held by Democrats and republicans between 1994 and 2014. As the graph below shows, the gap is widening.Pew Ideological Divide Graphic

There’s a couple of things to note in the graph. First, the gap between the center of each party is further apart now than 20 years ago. The second is the bulking up of the extremes. “92% of Republicans are to the right of the median Democrat, and 94% of Democrats are to the left of the median Republican”. This shows what we’ve all felt: the parties have moved apart and common ground is increasingly rare.

The Pew study was issued more than a year ago. However, anyone watching this year’s presidential debates will attest that ideological differences between the parties is definitely not diminishing.

America moves forward when reasonable people can disagree, find common ground, and compromise. Over the past 20 years, however, fewer partisans see the other side as reasonable; fewer are willing to compromise. Common ground is disappearing.

The Pew Study is pretty depressing for those of us who want less fighting between the parties and more problem solving. However, there is some good news in the report. While there’s movement towards the extremes, the majority of Americans remain neither uniformly liberal nor conservative. As the Pew Research Center notes, “more [Americans] believe their representatives in government should meet halfway to resolve contentious disputes rather than hold out for more of what they want.”

Politicians often claim to speak for the “silent majority.” This is usually not the case as it’s their next statement is often a pander to the most extreme elements of their party. The real silent majority are those who want their representatives to “meet halfway.”

The problem is, however, the silent majority is, well, silent. No one hears them. In a political context, silence equates to voting. If it’s the extremists who vote, then politicians listen to the extremists. When a majority of Americans stand up and insist that their representatives work together, politicians will find a way to work together. Maybe not right away, but eventually they’ll get the message.

Until the majority speaks up (votes), however, it’s the crazy uncles that are listened to–and not just on Thanksgiving. In fact, it seems the crazy uncles are part of the presidential debates now, too.

One thought on “America’s Disappearing Common Ground

  1. Once again, you are the voice of reason. Voting is crucial and sadly, too many feel that their vote doesn’t matter.

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